Turning my obession wtih Italy into something I can pretend is constructive.

Hidden in Plain Sight: Sorrento’s Valley of the Mills

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The first time I was in Sorrento I completely missed la Vallone dei Mullini, the “Valley of the Mills”, tucked into a gorge below street level just inland from Piazza Tasso.  I got back to the States and suddenly everyone was asking me, “Did you see the abandoned well?”  I had no idea what they were talking about, so I looked it up online and kicked myself for passing 100 feet away from this enchanting scene and never noticing it.  

There was a huge volcanic eruption in the Mediterranean between 35,000 - 37,000 years ago (it still amazes me how they can know that).  The area around Sorrento was violently shaken and deep crevasses were cut in the limestone foundations, some of which was subsequently filled with volcanic debris.  The large gorges created “valleys” of sorts, five large rifts in the earth that helped to protect the ancient town of Sorrento (which the Romans called “Surrentum”). Over the years, water from an underground basin forced its way through some of the cracks, clearing out the debris as it made its way to the sea and creating new water sources that encouraged settlement in the valleys.

In the 10th century a complex of industry was built in one of the valleys: a mill for grinding wheat for flour and a sawmill that provided various types of wood and chaff to Sorrentine cabinet-makers (“wheat board”, made from chaff - the processed dry husks and casings from seeds and wheat - is a superior substitute for particle board and hardwood plywood).  Attached to the mills was a public wash-house used by the women of the community.

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In 1866, part of the gorge that let water in the valley flow out to the sea was filled in to create Piazza Tasso.  This created a drastic rise of humidity in the valley and it was soon considered unsuitable for living and working.  The valley virtually had its own climate, creating conditions favorable for types of vegetation that couldn’t grow above, like “Phillitus Vulgaris”, a rare fern that soon overtook the mill, its roots digging into the stone, and covered the floor and walls of the gorge in a thick layer of green.

The Valley of the Mills is the only one of the five gorges that can still be easily discerned; the others have been covered by roads and buildings over the centuries.  It really is quite enchanting to see from above, and if you’re there when its dry and safe to walk on the humid rocks you can climb down into the valley to get a different perspective.  It was a bit wet when I was there in December with my parents so we didn’t chance it, but instead added to my list of reasons to go back to this charming town with its incredible geological history.  

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Lake Garda, Italy. #italy #italia #italytrip #lakegarda #lagodigarda #beautifulplaces #takemethere

Lake Garda, Italy. #italy #italia #italytrip #lakegarda #lagodigarda #beautifulplaces #takemethere

#MM Frozen’s “Let It Go” in Italian: “All’Alba Sorgerò”

Ever heard a version of your favorite song in another language and wondered how the lyrics compare?  Disney, anticipating the international success of their latest animated feature “Frozen”, scoured the globe to find women to sing the movie’s Oscar-winning song, “Let It Go”.  In the case of the Italian version, they picked an Argentinian girl named Martina Stoessel - a really odd choice to me.  Perhaps she’s famous in Italy - I’m not sure - but I would’ve loved to hear an Italian singer perform this song in Italian, someone without a foreign accent.  

Anyway, I went through the lyrics to the Italian version and compared them below with Demi Lavato’s version in the US.  The differences were striking!  Check it out, and watch the music video for “All’Alba Sorgerò” (the Italian version of “Let It Go”, which translates to “At Dawn I Will Rise”) and Italian lyrics beneath it.

Comparison between the English version of “Let It Go” and the English interpretation of the Italian lyrics (in parenthesis):

Let It Go (At Dawn I Will Rise)

The snow glows white on the mountain tonight, (The snow that falls above me)
Not a footprint to be seen. (covers everything with its vigour)
A kingdom of isolation and it looks like I’m the queen. (In this remote kingdom I am the queen)
The wind is howling like this swirling storm inside. (By now the storm in my heart has already flared up)
Couldn’t keep it in, Heaven knows I tried. (My will will not stop the storm) 

Don’t let them in, don’t let them see, (Look again at yourself, only you know)
Be the good girl you always had to be. (make sure that they never discover)
Conceal, don’t feel, don’t let them know. (People will not forgive)
Well, now they know. (but by now they know)

Let it go, let it go (From now on I’ll let …) 
Can’t hold it back anymore (…my heart guide me a little)
Let it go, let it go ((I will forget everything I know) 
Turn my back and slam the door (and from today I will change)
And here I stand and here I’ll stay (I remain here, just me)
Let it go, let it go (I will let go, I will let go) 
The cold never bothered me anyway (the cold isn’t my problem)

It’s funny how some distance makes everything seem small (Maybe sometimes it’s good to distance yourself a bit)
And the fears that once controlled me can’t get to me at all. (It can seem like a huge leap but I will confront it!)
Up here in the cold thin air I finally can breathe. (in the icy snow I will find the place where)
I know I left a life behind but I’m too relieved to grieve. (no one has ever given up on me, but was a part of me)

Let it go, let it go (From now on I will find…)
Can’t hold it back anymore (…my true identity)
Let it go, let it go (I will discover, I will discover)
Turn my back and slam the door (what freedom is)
And here I stand, and here I’ll stay (I remain here, just me)
Let it go, let it go (I will let go, I will let go)
The cold never bothered me anyway (the cold isn’t my problem)

Standing frozen (Like the wind)
In the life I’ve chosen. (I follow what I feel)
You won’t find me. (I’ve already cut away…)
The past is all behind me (… my past)
Buried in the snow. (You will not find me)

Let it go, let it go (I know, yes I know)
Can’t hold it back anymore (like the sun I will fade)
Let it go, let it go (because then, because then)
Turn my back and slam the door (I will rise with the dawn)
And here I stand, and here I’ll stay (I will be come the light that …)
Let it go, let it go (…shines! that shines!)
The cold never bothered me anyway (The cold is part of me now)

 

#MM All’Alba Sorgerò / Martina Stoessel

La neve che cade sopra di me (The snow that falls above me)
copre tutto con il suo brio (covers everything with its vigour)
In questo remoto regno (In this remote kingdom)
la regina sono io (I am the queen)
Ormai nel cuore la tempesta infuria già (By now the storm in my heart has already flared up)
non la fermerà la mia volontà (My will will not stop the storm) 
Riguarda te, tu sola sai, fai in modo che non si scopra mai (Look again at yourself, only you know, make sure that they never discover)
la gente non perdonerà (People will not forgive)
ma ormai lo sa (but by now they know)

D’ora in poi lascerò che il cuore mi guidi un po’ (From now on I’ll let my heart guide me a little)
scorderò quel che so e da oggi cambierò (I will forget everything I know and from today I will change)
rimango qui soltanto io (I remain here, just me)
Lascerò, lascerò che il freddo non sia un problema mio (I will let go, I will let go, the cold isn’t my problem)

Magari a volte è un bene allontanarsi un po’ (Maybe sometimes it’s good to distance yourself a bit)
può sembrare un salto enorme ma io lo affronterò (It can seem like a huge leap but I will confront it!)
nella neve gelida ritrovo il posto che (in the icy snow I will find the place where)
nessuno mi ha lasciato mai (no one has ever given up on me)
ma apparteneva a me (but was a part of me)

D’ora in poi troverò la mia vera identità (From now on I will find my true identity)
scoprirò scoprirò cosa sia la libertà (I will discover, I will discover what freedom is)
rimango qui soltanto io (I remain here, just me)
Lascerò, lascerò che il freddo non sia un problema mio (I will let go, I will let go, the cold isn’t my problem)

Come vento seguo ciò che sento (Like the wind, I follow what I feel)
Ho già dato un taglio al mio passato (I’ve already cut away my past) 
Non mi troverai (You will not find me)

Si lo so, come il sole tramonterò (I know, yes I know, like the sun I will fade)
perché poi, perché poi io all’alba sorgerò because then, because then, I will rise with the dawn!)
diventerò la luce che brillerà brillerà (I will become the light that shines! that shines!)
il freddo è parte ormai di me (The cold is part of me now)

"There are no foreign lands.  It is the traveler only who is foreign." - Robert Louis Stevenson (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894), the renowned Scottish author, poet, essayist and travel writer famous for, among other works, “Treasure Island”, “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” and “An Inland Voyage”.

"There are no foreign lands.  It is the traveler only who is foreign." - Robert Louis Stevenson (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894), the renowned Scottish author, poet, essayist and travel writer famous for, among other works, “Treasure Island”, “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” and “An Inland Voyage”.

My Monteriggioni Fail

One of my Italian friends had told me that I *had* to go to Monteriggioni while I was in Siena, that it was this tiny walled town full of cute shops and restaurants always abustle with activity.  So I looked up restaurants on TripAdvisor and decided to go there after I left the Abbey of San Galgano.  It was just after 6pm, which I figured was perfect: I could wander the shops for the last hour or so that they were open, maybe stop into a caffé for an aperitif and then have dinner once the restaurants opened after 7:30.

Boy, was I off-base.

This was my first introduction to how DEAD small Tuscan tourist towns are in December.  I pulled up and parked.  I was one of maybe three cars in sight (MAYBE three - that’s being generous).  I walked up around the tall stone walls to the arched entrance.

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Didn’t have such a great feeling about this, but walked in through the opening and found this:

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Yep.  Totally empty.  It felt like a ghost town.  All the lights were on but no one was home!  I decided to walk down what looked to be the main (and only) street.  See that dark spot at the end of the picture above?  That’s not where the street stops.  That’s where the TOWN stops.  It’s THAT small!  So I went down a small alley on my left and after a (very short) block came to a lovely town park.

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Back up the hundred meters or so toward the side of town I started from, through a street literally called “Narrow Alley” to the - still empty! - main square. 

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To my left I thought I heard some activity in the restaurant I had wanted to eat at, Il Pozzo…

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… but it wasn’t even 6:30 yet and there was no way I was going to wait around outside in the cold in an empty piazza for an hour until they opened, so with one last wistful look around the square I turned around and walked back out to my car to return to Siena.

Have you ever been to Monteriggioni when there were actually people there and things were open?  What was it like? What was your favorite thing?

The Real King Arthur

Last year I saw a picture on Tumblr of beautiful ruins of a church, now open to the sky.  The columns of the nave were huge stone pillars, majestic and mystical.  I was instantly enchanted (and immediately began planning my non-even-close-to-being-real wedding there).  You can read my original post HERE.

Not only is the ruined abbey gorgeous – particularly at sunset – but the abbey and the monastery above it have possible connections to both the legend of King Arthur and to the Holy Grail!  So two months ago while I was staying in Siena, I rented a car, turned on my GPS and was a little surprised when it popped up by name: L’Abbazia di San Galgano.

The Abbey of San Galgano was built in the 13th century in the valley of the Merse river between two medieval villages, Chiusdino and Monticiano.  Just up a rise is the Montesiepi Hermitage.  Neither structure was built during Saint Galgano’s life.

Galgano Guidotti was a knight and a warrior, born in 1148 in nearby Chiusdino.  When he was 32 years old, the Angel Gabriel appeared to him and told him to follow him, forsake violence, build a round chapel at Montesiepi and retire there to live.  Against the advice of his family, Galgano got on his horse that – miraculously – took him straight to Montesiepi without even being guided. 

I certainly needed to be guided.  My GPS had me winding through the Tuscan hillside so much that I totally lost my sense of direction.  The roads were narrow and at one point I had to slam on my brakes when a tractor pulled out in front of me.  You heard me: a tractor. 

I was captivated by the beautiful landscapes around me so it came as a surprise when I turned a corner, looked to my left and – bam! – there was this long, tree-lined road leading to the enchanted ruins, looking like they had just popped out of a picture.  Then I looked up toward the hilltop just a short walk from the abbey, and saw the Hermitage of Montesiepi.

The horse eventually brought Galgano to the site on the hill where the Hermitage now stands.  When he arrived there, Galgano jumped from his mount and, as a symbol of his rejection of war, unsheathed his sword and with great force shoved it into a rock (which is said to have “parted like butter”).  After hearing of this miracle, pilgrims began to come see Galgano at Montesiepi, and before his death in 1181AD (only a short year later) 19 such miracles were performed.  Galgano never got the chance to build his chapel, but in the last year of his life he became a Cistercian monk and after his death and canonization (just four years after his death) his monastic brothers completed his task for him.

In 1218, the monks and number of pilgrims outgrew the hermitage so the monks decided to build the Abbey of San Galgano.  Within the next few centuries, however, the Abbey was destroyed by a passing army and by 1789 it was completely abandoned, leaving the ruins we see now.

I arrived just as the sun was started to set, bought my ticket and ran into the abbey. There was a beautiful orange glow on the stone and I spent a few minutes just walking around, taking it all in. 

I wanted to make it up to the monastery before it closed, though, so I took a few pictures and then started on the trail leading up the hill. 

Before heading into the main chamber, I stopped into the gift shop (of course) where an elderly woman was sitting with four cats.  She seemed a bit cross until I complimented her feline friends, after which she brightened up and was quite friendly. I bought a jar of crema di castagne (which turned out to be some of the best I’ve tried), stuffed it in my purse and headed into the main chamber.

Now for the fun stuff.

Some scholars – and I’m in no way vouching for their credibility – think that the story of Saint Galgano shoving his sword into the stone may have inspired the tale of Excalibur and that Galgano himself may be the true “King Arthur”.  For many years it was a fairly commonly held belief that the sword was a fake, created more recently to fabricate some sort of connection between the two figures.  However, a few years ago the University of Pavia certified that the sword is actually from the 12th century, at least giving more credence to the truth behind the story of Saint Galgano, if not proving the connection with King Arthur.  Is it possible the “true” sword in the stone is in Italy??

"In this rock, summit of the hill of Montesiepi, Galgano Guidotti in 1180 planted the sword, venerating in it the cross, symbol of peace and salvation"

Taking it one step further, some people believe that the round chapel at Montesiepi that I had just stepped into might just be the hiding place of the fabled Holy Grail.  The must-sought-after Grail is the chalice that Jesus and his apostles drank out of at the Last Supper, supposedly bestowed with numerous supernatural qualities.  There have been rumors for centuries of a secret underground space that can only be accessed by moving a specific stone in the floor of the anteroom.  Shockingly, no one has found this stone (yet), including me.  And trust me, I looked.

After a few minutes staring at the sword, now enclosed in a hard plastic bubble, and looking for a loose stone in the floor that might uncover the Holy Grail, I walked back outside followed by two of the four cats. The Tuscan sun was truly setting now and as I walked back down the hill, the mystical quality of this place that is tied to so many legends was almost tangible.  Go, the next time you’re in Siena, and experience a piece of history – and of legend. 

Amen.
"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Federico Fellini

Amen.

"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Federico Fellini

#MM Elisa / A Modo Tuo

This is a beautiful, poignant song on Elisa’s latest album, “L’Anima Vola”, which I originally assumed she had written for her daughter.  And while I’m sure its dedicated to her, I quickly discovered that “A Modo Tuo” was actually written by another Italian superstar, Luciano Ligabue. Enjoy!

#MM Elisa / A Modo Tuo

Sarà difficile diventar grande (It will be difficult to grow up)
prima che lo diventi anche tu (before you do, too)
tu che farai tutte quelle domande (You who will ask all these questions)
io fingerò di saperne di più (I will pretend to know more about it)
sarà difficile (It will be difficult)
ma sarà come deve essere (But it will be as it has to be)
metterò via i giochi (I will put away the toys)
proverò a crescere (I will try to grow)

Sarà difficile chiederti scusa (It will be difficult to ask your forgiveness)
per un mondo che è quel che è (for a world that is what it is)
io nel mio piccolo tento qualcosa (In my smallness, I try something)
ma cambiarlo è difficile (but to change it is difficult)
sarà difficile (It will be difficult)
dire tanti auguri a te (to say Happy Birthday to you)
a ogni compleanno (at every birthday)
vai un po’ più via da me (you go a little further away from me)

A modo tuo (in your way)
andrai (you will go)
a modo tuo (in your way)
camminerai e cadrai, ti alzerai (you will walk and you will fall, you will get up)
sempre a modo tuo (always in your way)
A modo tuo (in your way)
vedrai (you will see)
a modo tuo (in your wall)
dondolerai, salterai, canterai (you will swing, you will jump, you will sing)
sempre a modo tuo (always in your way)

Sarà difficile vederti da dietro (It will be difficult to see your from behind)
sulla strada che imboccherai (on the street that you will enter)
tutti i semafori (all the stoplights)
tutti i divieti (all the prohibitions)
e le code che eviterai (and the lines that you will avoid)
sarà difficile (It will be difficult)
mentre piano ti allontanerai (while slowly you distance yourself)
a cercar da sola (to search alone)
quella che sarai (for what you will be)

A modo tuo (in your way)
andrai (you will go)
a modo tuo (in your way)
camminerai e cadrai, ti alzerai (you will walk and you will fall, you will get up)
sempre a modo tuo (always in your way)
A modo tuo (in your way)
vedrai (you will see)
a modo tuo (in your wall)
dondolerai, salterai, canterai (you will swing, you will jump, you will sing)
sempre a modo tuo (always in your way)

Sarà difficile (It will be difficult)
lasciarti al mondo (to leave you to the world)
e tenere un pezzetto per me (and to keep a piece for me)
e nel bel mezzo del (and in the middle of)
tuo girotondo (your ring-around-the-rosie)
non poterti proteggere (not to be able to protect you)
sarà difficile (it will be difficult)
ma sarà fin troppo semplice (but it will be too simple in the end)
mentre tu ti giri (while you turn around)
e continui a ridere (and continue to laugh)

A modo tuo (in your way)
andrai (you will go)
a modo tuo (in your way)
camminerai e cadrai, ti alzerai (you will walk and you will fall, you will get up)
sempre a modo tuo (always in your way)
A modo tuo (in your way)
vedrai (you will see)
a modo tuo (in your wall)
dondolerai, salterai, canterai (you will swing, you will jump, you will sing)
sempre a modo tuo (always in your way)

Hiking Orvieto’s “Ring of the Rock”

This article originally appeared in L’Italo Americano (click to subscribe). 

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            “What are you going to do today?” asked Sabrina, the owner of Ripa Medici, the adorable two-room B&B I was staying at for a week in Orvieto.  Technically in Umbria but off to the side a bit, wedged in between Tuscany and Lazio, Orvieto sits on the top of a plateau made of “tufa” rock (“tuff”, in English).  “Tufa” is consolidated volcanic ash.  In the case of Orvieto’s high seat above the valleys surrounding it, this volcanic ash was deposited here almost 100,000 years ago.  Locally it’s known as simply “La Rupe” – “The Rock”.

            “Well,” I say, “I think I’m going to hike l’Annello della Rupe” (“The Ring of the Rock”).

            “Oh!” Sabrina exclaims, setting down a Nutella crepe in front of me.  “Che faticoso!”

            Despite Sabrina’s warning that it’s a strenuous hike, I set out after breakfast through Porta Maggiore and walk down through one of the parking lots outside the town walls to one of five entrances to the trail.  The “ring” around the “rock” is a trail about halfway down the plateau that completely circles it, looking down at the valley below while the edges of the city loom high overhead. Its relatively flat (until you have to climb back up to Orvieto) and, in this part of the trail, well-marked and even paved!  Joggers, wrapped up against the winter chill, lope by and mothers pushing strollers chat as they pass in the other direction.

            At various points there are large signs pointing out various things to look at along the way.  The first one I come to is in a small clearing, the tall trees giving way to expose an incredible view of the Rock.  It towers above the trail, its sheer immensity overwhelming.  

The sign points out small holes in the side of the rock face, like little windows of underground houses.  In fact, these are windows to pigeon caves.  In medieval times people in Orvieto would “farm” pigeons. They dug caves under the city and equipped them with water for drinking and bird-baths, small holes for nesting and a window to the outside so they could leave to hunt and return to eat and, well, be eaten.  You can walk through the caves as part of the “Underground Orvieto” Tour that leaves from Piazza Duomo.

            I pass over the funicular track that is constantly bringing tourists and locals alike up from the lower Orvieto train station to the upper, medieval town.  Soon the paved trail disappears – and so do the people.  I walk alone on an overgrown path, the vegetation much more wet and wild.  It doesn’t seem like the sun hits this part of the trail for very long or very often.  It makes me feel like I’m traipsing through a forgotten wood, a fairy getting ready to drop out of a yellow maple or a gnome to pop out of a hollowed-out tree stump.  This is definitely my favorite part of l’Annello della Rupe, no question.

            And what are these conditions perfect for? Growing mushrooms, of course! Two large caves that were originally created when the stone was quarried for building were later used to grow mushrooms.  I’ve never thought of anyone having to actively grow mushrooms, but of course they do!  The caves have gone out of use, now, though.

            The trail becomes a bit more defined right before I arrive at Necropoli estrusca del Crocefisso del tufo, the Etruscan burial site designed around 600BC as a small city (read my article on the Necropoli HERE). Covered in grass and algae and almost level with the ground around them, the tops of the tombs blend into their environment.  You can enter the necropolis – and even some of the tombs! - and walk down the small streets laid out like a grid in the shadow of the Rock.  If you can read Etruscan (anyone?), you can identify the deceased assigned to each tomb; their names are still etched above the entrances. 

            A little farther on I come across the church that houses the cross that gave the necropolis its name, Chiesa del Crocefisso del Tufo.  You’d never know it was a church; it just looks like a small door in the side of the cliff.  The church – and the crucifix, actually – are carved into and out of the tufa of the Rock.  Legend has it (though scholars scoff) that a soldier named Floriano in the 6th century was falsely accused by his comrades-in-arms of theft and murder.  Distraught, Floriano threw himself from the top of the cliff clutching tightly to the crucifix he always wore around his neck. Miraculously, he landed completely unharmed and, as a sign of gratitude, began to carve a new crucifix out of tufa rock… with his hands. 

            After about three hours – and about three hundred pictures of trees – I turn a corner around the cliff wall and see Porta Maggiore ahead of me.  It hadn’t been as “faticoso” as I had been warned. In fact, it had been a beautiful, relaxing morning, a stroll through a bit of history, a varied and delightful walk through nature.  If you have a few hours to spare when you’re in Orvieto and want to get away from the typical tourist sites, give l’Annello della Rupe a try; you’ll discover more than you expect along the Ring of the Rock.

#MM Nek / Laura Non C’è

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Who does Nek’s voice remind you of in this song??

If you don’t say “Sting”, you’re not really listening.

This music video came on while I was getting ready for dinner on New Year’s Eve in Cortona and I couldn’t think of anything else. When I went downstairs and told my group of tablemates from Milan, they all agreed (so I felt a bit validated).  Enjoy!

#MM Nek / Laura Non C’è

Laura non c’è, è andata via (There is no Laura, she went away)
Laura non è più cosa mia (Laura is no longer mine)
e te che sei qua e mi chiedi perché (and you are here and ask me why)
l’amo se niente più mi da’ (I love her if she no longer gives me anything)
mi manca da spezzare il fiato (I miss so much it interrupts my breath)
fa male e non lo sa (it hurts and she doesn’t know)
che non mi è mai passata (that I never got over it)

Laura non c’è, capisco che (There is no Laura, I understand that)
è stupido cercarla in te (It’s stupid to look for her in you)
Io sto da schifo credi e non lo vorrei (I feel like shit, believe it, and I wouldn’t want…)
stare con te e pensare a lei (to stay with you and to think of her)
stasera voglio stare acceso (this evening I want to stay turned on)
andiamocene di la’ (let’s get out of here, go next door)
a forza di pensare ho fuso. (by thinking so much, I’m burnt out)

Chorus:
Se vuoi ci amiamo adesso, se vuoi (If you want us to make love to each other now, if you want)
però non è lo stesso tra di noi (but it’s not the same between us)
da solo non mi basto stai con me (alone, I am not enough - stay with me)
solo è strano che al suo posto ci sei te, ci sei te. (it’s only strange that in her place there you are, there you are)

Laura dov’è, mi manca sai (Where is Laura? I miss her, you know)
magari c’è un altro accanto a lei (Perhaps there is another next to her)
giuro non ci ho pensato mai (I swear I have never thought of it)
che succedesse proprio a noi (that it would happen to us)
lei si muove dentro un altro abbraccio (She moved inside another embrace)
su di un corpo che non è più il mio (on to a body that is no longer mine)
e io cosi non ce la faccio. (and so I can no longer make it)

Se vuoi ci amiamo adesso, se vuoi (If you want us to love each other now, if you want)
però non è lo stesso tra di noi (but it’s not the same between us)
da solo non mi basto stai con me (alone, I am not enough - stay with me)
solo è strano che al suo posto ci sei te, ci sei te. (it’s only strange that in her place there you are, there you are)

Forse è difficile cosi ma non so che cosa fare (Maybe its difficult like this but I don’t know what to do)
Credo che sia logico, per quanto io provi a scappare lei c’è. (I believe it’s logical, for how much I try to escape, she is there)

Non vorrei che tu fossi un’emergenza ma tra bene e amore c’è
solo Laura e la mia coscienza. (I hope you’re not an emergency but between the good times and love there is only Laura and my conscience)
Se vuoi ci amiamo adesso oh no (If you want us to love each other, oh no)
però non è lo stesso ora so (but it’s not the same now, I know)
c’è ancora il suo riflesso tra me e te (There is still her reflection between me and you)
mi dispiace ma non posso Laura c’è. (I’m sorry but I can’t, Laura is there)
Se vuoi ci amiamo adesso oh no (If you want us to love each other now, oh no)
mi casca il mondo addosso ora so (the world falls on top of me now, I know)
c’è ancora il suo riflesso tra me e te (there is still her reflection between me and you)
mi dispiace ma non posso Laura c’è (I’m sorry but I can’t, Laura is there)
Laura c’è (Laura is there)

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