Turning my obession wtih Italy into something I can pretend is constructive.

Bologna: Teatro Anatomico

image

I didn’t know much about Bologna before I decided to go there.  I didn’t know it’s history, it’s traditions, it’s layout or transportation systems, but I did know two things:

1) Bologna is the capitol of the Emilia-Romagna region and thus the self-proclaimed capitol of Italian food

2) In Teatro Anatomico, the Anatomical Theater of the oldest European University, they used to dissect human corpses for educational purposes.

Teatro Anatomico is inside the Archiginnasio Palace, the first permanent building of the University of Bologna that joined all of the disciplines in one space in 1563, instead of them being scattered in buildings across the city.  The entrance to the palace is in the square behind Piazza Maggiore, under a portico of 30 arches.  When I was there in December there were no lines, no crowds, just a simple sign outside naming the building (which is now one of the most important city-run libraries in Italy) and the hours.

I climbed one of the two large staircases, not really sure where I was going.  The loge wraps around the central courtyard, but I don’t remember a thing about the courtyard.  I was too distracted by the walls!

In the space between each arch was a plaque honoring one of the university’s historically-significant professors and around each one were dozens and dozens of small coats of arms!  They seemed to be hung all over, filling every space, in all colors and types with little rhyme or reason. I later read that each one represented a student who had attended the university in the 16th - 18th centuries, both Italians and those from abroad.  It was a chaotic, colorful mess!

…And a beautiful memorial :)

image

image

image

I still, though, had no idea where I was going.  There didn’t seem to be many people about and I hadn’t seen any signs for the teatro anatomico since entering.  I strolled down opulently-decorated hallways and finally came to the library entrance, where I asked the gentleman stationed there.

image

When I entered the anatomic theater, the first thing that struck me was how small it was.  I know that doesn’t really make sense - it couldn’t be much bigger and still allow everyone to see what was going on in the central table - but it surprised me for some reason.  

image

The theater was built in 1637 so that medical students could learn by observing dissections of human corpses.  Statues and busts of famous and notable Italian and Bolognese physicians adorn the walls, as well as two “skinless” statues on either side of the professor’s chair and two full-size statues of Hippocrates and Galen, the most prominent physicians of Greece and Rome, respectively.

image

Just before leaving I reached over the balustrade surrounding the dissection table to get the view of Apollo on the ceiling that a corpse would’ve “seen”… 

image

Nice view for a dead guy, huh?

For hours and directions, CLICK HERE.

#MM La Gatta (Sul Tetto) / Giorgia

This song is HOT!!  I’m used to hearing Giorgia sing beautiful, powerful ballads, so when I clicked on the video for “La Gatta (Sul Tetto)”, in which she crawls around the floor in a catwoman suit, I was a bit taken aback!  Some may say the track is a bit dated, some of the lyrics may seem a little strange, but I start dancing when the drums kick in and don’t stop till the very last note!  Enjoy!

Sono la gatta sul tetto, e rubo il vento per me… (I am the cat on the roof, and I steal the wind for myself)

Dove sei? È tardi e non lo sai che ho bisogno di te (Where are you? It’s late and you don’t know that I need you)

Con chi sei? Il fumo mi consuma, sai? (Who are you with? Do you know that the smoke consumes me?)

Di notte sono gelosa (I’m jealous at night)

Me la pagherai!  (You will pay for it)

Provo a respirare, devo stare calma (I try to breath, I need to stay calm)

Controllare le funzioni biologiche, (to control my biological functions)

Me la pagherai… (You will pay for it)

Dove ho messo le istruzioni? Questo gioco si fa duro, (Where did I put the instructions? This game gets tough)

Ma sono dura più di te! (But I am tougher than you!)

Come sto - la luna mi ha chiamato (How am I? - the moon called to me)

E se mi gira ci vado (and if it turns me on, I go there)

Nel frattempo sto qua come una scema (in the meantime I stay here like an idiot)

E imparo a stare da sola (and learn to be alone)

Io vivo di notte (I live at night)

E cerco il senso di me (and look for the significance of myself)

Sai quante volte ho pianto, come te (You know how many times I cried, like you)

Non puoi incolpare un altro per quello che non sei (You can’t blame someone else for what you are not)

Chi mai ti amerà se non ti ami da te? (Whoever will love you if you don’t love yourself?)

Me la pagherai! (You will pay for it)

Provo a respirare, devo stare calma (I try to breath, I have to stay calm)

Controllare le funzioni biologiche, (To control my biological functions)

Me la pagherai… (You will pay for it)

Dove ho messo le istruzioni? (Where did I put the instructions?)

Questo gioco si fa duro, (This game gets tough)

Ma sono dura più di te! (But I am tougher than you!)

Cambierai, cercherai, scoprirai, (You will change, you will search, you will discover)

La solitudine, l’inquietudine (The solitude, the anxiety)

Crescerai, scoprirai, capirai (You will grow, you will discover, you will understand)

Che quello che conta sei soltanto tu (That what counts is only you)

Fammi sentire che sono una donna (Make me feel that I am a woman)

Senza bisogno di mettere una gonna (Without having to wear a skirt)

Fammi scoprire il mio essere gentile (Make me discover my gentle self)

Senza bisogno di farti da mamma! (Without having to act like your mother)

Voglio trovare un paio di risposte (I want to find a couple of answers)

A queste insopportabili domande (To these unbearable questions)

Sul senso vero della vita insieme, (About the true meaning of life together)

Sul senso della vita mia (About the meaning of my life)

Voglio rinascere e essere una gatta (I want to be reborn as a cat)

E diventare un po’ più intelligente (and to become a bit more intelligent)

E quando sbatto la faccia sul muro (and when I beat the face on the wall)

Scoprire che non era abbastanza duro! (to discover that it is not tough enough)

Buon Ferra… what? Find out why Italians celebrate the 15th of August on the site today! http://onedayinitaly.com/buon-ferragosto/
 #ferragosto #instaitalia #buonferragosto #summer #estate #positano #italytrip

Buon Ferra… what? Find out why Italians celebrate the 15th of August on the site today! http://onedayinitaly.com/buon-ferragosto/
#ferragosto #instaitalia #buonferragosto #summer #estate #positano #italytrip

Giardino degli Aranci #Roma #Rome #italytrip #oranges #summer #summervacation

Giardino degli Aranci #Roma #Rome #italytrip #oranges #summer #summervacation

The Cross that Inspired St. Francis

Many people know the story of St. Francis of Assisi.  He was the son of somewhat well-to-do cloth merchants in a small Umbrian village in the 12th century.  He was a spoiled young man when he went off to seek glory in battle, but while away was “called” by God to shed his earthly possessions and follow a simple path of devotion and prayer.  

But that wasn’t the only time that God spoke directly to St. Francis.  In 1205AD Francis was passing by San Damiano (at that time a small, run-down church on the hill below Assisi) when he felt a sudden urge to go inside and pray.  Above the tiny altar was an iconic crucifix, probably painted by a Syrian monk in the 12th century.  Christ is painted onto the cross surrounded by witnesses: the Virgin Mary, his apostles, Mary Magdalene, and a series of angels and saints welcoming him into heaven.

While Francis was praying before the cross, Christ’s lips began to move and he spoke to Francis: “Francis, go repair my house which as you see is falling into ruin.”  

Francis took Christ’s words literally at first and began to rebuild San Damiano, founding the Franciscan order in the process. Today there is still a small monastery there which you can walk through, but the cross was taken by the Poor Clares, the Franciscan order founded by St. Francis’s closest female disciple, to the Church of St. Clare within Assisi’s walls in 1257AD.  You can still view it there, say a prayer and wait for Christ to speak to you… though you may not want to wait till his lips actually move.

 

Why do you travel?
(Photo of Siena by Jessica Andrews, OneDayInItaly.com | Find more photos and quotes about travel & Italy at OneDayInItaly.com)

Why do you travel?

(Photo of Siena by Jessica Andrews, OneDayInItaly.com | Find more photos and quotes about travel & Italy at OneDayInItaly.com)

The rooftops of Siena #TLTransportMe #italy #beauty #summer

The rooftops of Siena #TLTransportMe #italy #beauty #summer

What’s your light in dark places?
"May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out." ~ JRR Tolkien, best known for writing "The Lord of the Rings" series and its prequel, "The Hobbit".  
Photo by Jessica Andrews (OneDayInItaly.com) in Assisi, Umbria, Italy, the home of St. Francis of Assisi.

What’s your light in dark places?

"May it be a light to you in dark places, when all other lights go out." ~ JRR Tolkien, best known for writing "The Lord of the Rings" series and its prequel, "The Hobbit".  

Photo by Jessica Andrews (OneDayInItaly.com) in Assisi, Umbria, Italy, the home of St. Francis of Assisi.

Ciao, Venice. #beautiful #wow #fairytale #venezia #venice

Ciao, Venice. #beautiful #wow #fairytale #venezia #venice

Looking down on Piazza del Popolo from the Borghese Gardens. #roma #rome #summer #beautiful #summervacation

Looking down on Piazza del Popolo from the Borghese Gardens. #roma #rome #summer #beautiful #summervacation

Find us on Google+